Massage Therapy

Massage therapy is the manipulation of the soft tissues of the body for the purpose of normalizing those tissues and consists of manual techniques that include applying fixed or movable pressure, holding, and/or causing movement of or to the body.

Massage Therapy effects the circulation of blood and the flow of blood and lymph, reduce muscular tension or flaccidity, affect the nervous system through stimulation or sedation, and enhances tissue healing.

  • There are many benefits of Massage:
  • reduction of muscle tension and stiffness
  • relief of muscle spasms
  • greater flexibility and range of motion
  • increase of the ease and range of movement
  • relief of stress and aides in relaxation
  • promotes deeper and easier breathing
  • improvement of the circulation of blood and movement of lymph
  • relief of tension-related conditions, such as headaches and eyestrain
  • promotion of faster healing of soft tissue injuries, such as pulled muscles and sprained ligaments, and reduction in pain and swelling related to such injuries
  • reduction in the formation of excessive scar tissue following soft tissue injuries
  • enhancement in the health and nourishment of skin
  • improvement in posture through changing tension patterns that affect posture
  • reduction in stress and an excellent stress management tool
  • creation of a feeling of well-being
  • reduction in levels of anxiety
  • increase in awareness of the mind-body connection
  • promotion of a relaxed state of mental awareness

Origins

Massage therapy is one of the oldest health care practices known to history. References to massage are found in Chinese medical texts more than 4,000 years old.

Today, massage is one of the most popular healing modalities. It is used by conventional, as well as alternative, medical communities and is now covered by some health insurance plans.

While massage therapy is applied primarily with the hands, sometimes the forearms or elbows are used, and in some styles of massage even the feet are used. These techniques affect the muscular, skeletal, circulatory, lymphatic, nervous, and other systems of the body. The basic philosophy of massage therapy embraces the idea of aiding the ability of the body to heal itself.

Touch is the fundamental medium of massage therapy.  Because massage usually involves applying touch with some degree of pressure and movement, the massage therapist must use touch with sensitivity in order to determine the optimal amount of pressure to use for each person. For example, using too much pressure may cause the body to tense up, while using too little may not have enough effect. Touch used with sensitivity also allows the massage therapist to receive useful information via his or her hands about the client’s body, such as locating areas of muscle tension and other soft tissue problems. Because touch is also a form of communication, sensitive touch can convey a sense of caring—an essential element in the therapeutic relationship—to the person receiving massage.

In practice, many massage therapists use more than one technique or method in their work and sometimes combine several. Effective massage therapists ascertain each person’s needs and then use the techniques that will meet those needs best.